Stepping Up in 2021 Annual Conference

Saturday, October 9, 2021
Westerville Central High School
Hampton Inn & Suites Columbus Polaris

The OELMA Conference is on and in person! For the first time in over a year the librarians of Ohio are finally able to get back together for a day of exciting professional development opportunities! The date is set for October 9, 2021! It will be a one day conference but we already have some great things lined up including graphic novelist Derf Backderf, creator behind My Friend Dahmer, Trashed, and most recently, Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio. Dhonielle Clayton, author of The Belles and Tiny Pretty Things (now a Netflix series!) and COO of the nonprofit organization, We Need Diverse Books, will also be joining us virtually at the conference. In addition to several large sessions with some exciting speakers, there will be 16 concurrent sessions by librarians for librarians! These sessions have been really popular opportunities for professional development at the conference and we are excited to be able to hold them in person again! The conference committees are so excited to be planning an in-person event and we hope you are as excited as we are to finally be back together and working toward building better school library programs in Ohio!"


Click HERE to register for this event, or read below for full details on the conference. 


For the OELMA Conference Reservation site at the Hampton Inn & Suites Columbus Polaris, click HERE. 



Featured Speakers

This event is supported by the State Library of Ohio with federal funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Dhonielle Clayton

Dhonielle Clayton hails from the Washington, D.C. suburbs on the Maryland side, but now lives in New York City. She was an extremely fussy and particular child with an undying love for Cheerios (honey nut only), pink lemonade, and frosted animal cookies. A self-proclaimed school nerd, she loved covering her books with brown paper and filled her locker with Lisa Frank stickers. She loved putting headings on her homework, odd-looking pens and freshly sharpened pencils, and numerous notebooks to fill with her research. On most Saturdays you could find her with her equally nerdy Dad at Crown Books and then the comic bookstore where she stocked up on her weekly reading material. Plus, she was so spoiled that her grandfather took her to the library after school almost daily.

She attended Our Lady of Good Counsel High School because her parents thought Catholic school would keep her out of trouble. She went to Wake Forest University, and studied pre-med until she received a fateful F in Chemistry. This setback prompted her to change her major to English, and earned a BA. She rediscovered her love of children‘s fiction by re-reading Harriet the Spy, which pushed her to earn an MA in Children‘s Literature from Hollins University and an MFA Writing for Children at the New School.

She taught secondary school for several years – at a pre-professional ballet academy and a private K-8 school. She spent most of her twenties in and out of America – living in London, Paris, a small Japanese town, Bermuda – and wandering the planet. She‘s been on five out of seven continents, and has grand plans to reach all of them.

She is a former elementary and middle school librarian, and co-founder and owner of CAKE Literary, a creative kitchen whipping up decadent – and decidedly diverse – literary confections for middle grade, young adult, and women‘s fiction readers. She is also COO of the non-profit We Need Diverse Books. What‘s next? She will be enrolling in culinary school in New York City and plans to do something foodie and fun.

John Derf Backderf

Comics creator John Derf Backderf was born and raised in a small Ohio town outside of Akron, the son of a chemist and homemaker. At age 8, he discovered comic books at the town‘s corner drug store and fell in love with the art form.

After a brief stint at art school, he dropped out and worked on the back of a garbage truck for a year, an experience that was the basis for his comix project, TRASHED.

He later attended Ohio State University on a journalism scholarship and was a political cartoonist for the student paper, The Lantern, for three years. Derf began his professional career as a political cartoonist for a paper in South Florida, but was fired after two years for, as the editor put it, general tastelessness.

In 1990, his freeform comic strip THE CITY debuted in the Cleveland Edition, beginning a 24-year run. THE CITY appeared in nearly 150 weekly papers around the country, including The Village Voice, and won a Robert F. Kennedy Award for political satire in 2008.

When weekly papers began to fail, Derf abandoned strips for books. His first graphic novel, PUNK ROCK & TRAILER PARKS (SLG Publishing, 2009), a bawdy fictional account of the punk rock scene in Akron, Ohio, was cited by Booklist as "one of the stand-out graphic novels of the year." It became a bestseller in France after its 2014 release there and was awarded the Prix Bulles Zik literary prize.

Derf's most famous graphic novel is MY FRIEND DAHMER (Abrams Comicarts, 2012), a haunting account of his teenage friendship with the future serial killer. It has been hailed as one of the best graphic novels in recent memory by Slate, Publishers Weekly, USA Today, Kirkus Reviews, Le Monde, El Mundo, The Guardian and many more. Time magazine listed it as one of the five best non-fiction books of the year. It received an Alex Award from the American Library Association, one of only ten books honored. It has been translated into 17 languages and was awarded an Angoulême Prize at the Angoulême International Comics Festival in France, as well as the Priz du Polar and Prix Litararie, the top scholastic book award, both in France. The film adaptation of MY FRIEND DAHMER premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and played in cinemas in the US and abroad throughout 2017 and 2018.

His next graphic novel, TRASHED (Abrams Comicarts, 2016), inspired by his garbage truck career, won an Eisner Award and was named book-of-the-year by the Green Party of France. TRASHED is also in development as a film project.

His latest book is KENT STATE: FOUR DEAD IN OHIO (Abrams Comicarts, 2020). The Library Journal calls it Incendiary. Required reading for all Americans. It was named book-of-the-year by Publisher‘s Weekly, Forbes magazine, and the Herald of Scotland. KENT STATE was awarded the French Critic‘s Prize and Derf‘s second Alex Award from the ALA.

Backderf has also been nominated for multiple Eisner and Ignatz Awards, as well as Harvey and Reuben Awards. The Derf Collection, comprised of 34 years of original art and papers, was established in The Billy Ireland Cartoon Museum at Ohio State University in 2009.

Derf lives in Cleveland, for reasons he can no longer remember.

Conference Bookstore

New Content

New Content

Schedule of Events

                                  8:00am - 8:45am  

Vendors Open

                                  9:00am - 9:45am

Opening Speaker: Derf Beckderf

                                 10:00am - 10:45am

Session 1 Breakouts

                                 11:00am - 12:00pm 

Lunch Break/Vendors Open

                                 12:15pm - 12:45pm

Large Room Session

                                 1:15pm - 2:00pm

Session 2 Breakouts

                                 2:15pm - 3:00pm 

Large Room Session

                                 3:15pm - 4:00pm 

Session 3 Breakouts

                                 4:15pm - 5:00pm 

Closing Speaker



Bronze Sponsors




Exhibitors






10:00-10:45

1. Supporting teen emotional well-being through library programs
Room 2304

Jessica Dennison

9-12

Teens need a champion in their corner that will support their social emotional needs. Teacher librarians have a unique ability to meet these needs through the resources and activities curated for students. This session will provide participants with strategies to continue to support teens through library programs. Participants will engage in conversations and walk away with multiple strategies that can be implemented quickly within their program.

Social Emotional skills are pivotal in helping our students succeed. Teens come to us with intense emotions and often use the library as an escape. The library offers a unique opportunity to serve students in a way to support social emotional needs. This session will provide participants with activities they can implement in their own setting to support the needs of teens. Participants will have the chance to engage in discussion on strategies to support teen emotional wellbeing while providing library services. Strategies will include makerspace ideas, games, mindfulness strategies, and self care solutions for all.

2. Cultivating a NOTEworthy Collaboration with Music Ensembles
Room 2302

Angie Jameson

Nathan Bachofsky, Kendra Karriker (Choral & Orchestra Directors

7-9, 9-12

In this session, Jameson and her team will inspire library media specialists to go beyond the norm and co-teach with music teachers. They will provide practical examples of how to embed research, critical thinking, and creativity in various music classrooms. Further, they will discuss ways they leveraged technology to publish virtual concerts.

This session will provide examples of collaboration between the library media specialist and ensemble directors. Explore ways to enrich your program through technology, research, and creation.

3. Beyond Diverse Collections: DEI Leadership Through the Library
Room 2320

Lori Suffield

K-3, 4-6, 7-9

Want to do more to support the diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) work being done at your school? The library should be an important hub of advocacy and activity in these areas. This session will share ideas about programming and other initiatives that contribute to a schoolwide mindset around DEI.

Most librarians believe that curating diverse collections is an important way to support the diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) work in our schools, but what else can we do from our positions in the school library? This session will explore how a school librarian and physical education teacher combined forces with other faculty members to create a DEI committee and schoolwide programming for faculty and students. Session attendees will hear about the successes and challenges of these DEI initiatives, and ideas about how to adapt this programming at their own schools.

4 Books that are LIT
Room 2322

Brandi Young

9-12

Not sure what to read? Want to know what your kids are reading? Do you need to beef up your collection? Join us for a fast-paced look at over 100 amazing Young Adult books.

Too many times we don't have enough time to read to add to our collections and/or to know what our students are reading (or could be reading). In this session, we will present over 100 young adult titles in a high energy fast-paced adventure so participants are equipped with amazing books to read and include in their libraries.

1:20-2:05

1. Reading for Justice: One Community, One Book
Room 2302

Brandi Young

PK-3, 4-6, 7-9, 9-12

Join a high school and middle school librarian from Westerville City Schools to learn how we pulled off a community-wide read of Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds. We had over 300 people from both the school district and the community participate in both online discussion boards and virtual community discussions. Tips and tricks of how to organize, host, and write a grant for copies of the books for the community will be discussed.

Join a high school and middle school librarian from Westerville City Schools to learn how we pulled off a community-wide read of Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds. We had over 300 people from both the school district and the community participate in both online discussion boards and virtual community discussions. Tips and tricks of how to organize, host, and write a grant for copies of the books for the community will be discussed.

2. Improving your Collection with a Self-Improvement Section
Room 2304

Angela Wojtecki

7-9, 9-12

Join Angela as she shares her recent journey to plan, develop, and promote a new self-improvement learning section in her high school library this past Spring. Titles lists will be shared as well as tips in creating a new section to focus more on curating a new collection to meet the social-emotional needs of all students. The ideas shared here can also be applied for other special topic sub-collections as well.

This session is mainly geared for the MS/HS librarians--and will cover the process of creating a self-improvement collection as part of a library collection. This is a new project I am taking on this year to help improve the social-emotional learning resources available for our students and staff, and wanted to share the how-to's and the journey to get there as well as some recommended titles and ideas. Time will be spent at the end sharing ideas with participants and titles as well.

3. It's NOT just Doodling! Sketch notes for all students!
Room 2320

Dana Wright

4-6, 7-9, 9-12

Sketch notes or visual note taking are a great tool for students and provide many benefits. This amazing note taking technique combines images and words that enable students to tap into their creativity and brain power. I have collaborated and taught this skill to most students in our entire district.

Attendees will learn the basics of sketch notes and how to teach sketch noting to students. Sketch notes or visual note taking are a great tool for students and provide many benefits. This amazing note taking technique combines images and words that enable students to tap into their creativity and brain power. Attendees will see how this works and will try this hands on technique.

4. Step Up Your Resource Curation with INFOhio’s BLUEcloud Course Lists
Room 2312

Janah Shoemaker

PK-3, 4-6, 7-9, 9-12

Learn how BLUEcloud Course Lists can help you curate resource lists of both physical and digital materials for your students and teachers and collaborate with teachers to build instructional partnerships. Participants in this session will learn how to use BLUEcloud Course Lists with their library catalog and INFOhio Electronic Resources like Educator Tools and ISearch, where to receive training to use Course Lists, and ideas for how to display and use Course Lists with students and teachers.

Join INFOhio as we demonstrate our newest BLUEcloud product, BLUEcloud Course Lists, a resource list management tool that integrates directly with your library catalog, INFOhio’s Electronic Resources, and librarian and teacher vetted materials. Learn how BLUEcloud Course Lists can help you curate resource lists of both physical and digital materials for your students and teachers and collaborate with teachers to build instructional partnerships. Participants in this session will learn how to use BLUEcloud Course Lists with their library catalog and INFOhio Digital Content like Educator Tools and ISearch, where to receive training to use Course Lists, and ideas for how to display and use Course Lists with students and teachers.

5. Grab More Readers with Grab-and-Go Programming
Room 2322

Angie Jameson

High school students: Audrey Holmes and Fraya Brattebo

K-3, 4-6, 7-9, 9-12

Are you looking for ways to increase engagement with library programming? Offering grab-and-go programs may be just the ticket to reaching more students in your school community. When Angie Jameson realized that her readers were typically too busy to spend time in the library for leisur, she decided to offer grab-and-go programs, and in the 2020 school landscape, they were a smash hit! The reach far exceeded her expectations, and students have requested the offerings continue beyond the hybrid school year. Learn how to design an engaging program to reach your readers, makers, and bakers.

In this session, Jameson will share strategies for building successful grab-and-go library programming. She will walk attendees through the evolution of this program planning, and discuss critical components of the to-go programs. Further, she will share how student leaders took over parts of the planning process. Jameson plans to walk readers through creating personalized book lists using NovelistPlus, using Google Docs to build marketing content, and creating tutorial videos for the crafts included.

3:15-4:00

1. Lead from the Library: Sharing Quality Instructional Materials for K-12
Room 2304

Emily Rozmus , Sarah Mowery

PK-3, 4-6, 7-9, 9-12

Instructional materials matter. During this session participants will learn how to take the lead in sharing quality instructional materials. Participants will also be able to identify the components of quality instructional materials and how INFOhio resources provide no-cost, equitable access to supplemental quality instructional materials.

INFOhio provides Ohio educators, students, and families with no-cost, equitable access to quality instructional materials. Research shows that when educators have access to quality, standards-aligned instructional materials it makes a difference in their teaching practice as well as the instruction students receive. School librarians can take the lead when sharing and identifying quality instructional materials that are flexible and adaptive, culturally responsive, research-based, standards-aligned, and user friendly. Find out how INFOhio’s digital resources support these indicators of quality instructional materials and how you can use them to help your students achieve success inside and outside of the library.

2.  Another 100+ Web Resources Wojtecki & Jameson
Room 2300/2301

Angela Wojtecki

Angie Jameson

K-3, 4-6, 7-9, 9-12

Join the fabulously fun duo of Jameson and Wojtecki as they share over 100 (yes 100 or more) online resources that you can share and use when you return to your library after conference! We are back for another year and another one hundred new K-12 digital tools and resources that are sure to delight your learners and teachers.

We will review over 100 online resources (mostly free) that will enable students to create, be more engaged, as well as specific school library resources for us! This is a "traditional" session for conference and we are excited to bring it back to our members if you are willing to add it to the list of sessions

3. The Librarian's Guide to Collaboration
Room 2322

Annie Ruefle

PK-3, 4-6, 7-9, 9-12

School librarians are uniquely poised to provide the framework for the kinds of collaboration that help students to broaden perspectives and work toward common goals." (AASL standard III) Because we work with every teacher and student, and provide support to every discipline, we are able not only to identify opportunities in which learners can collaborate in meaningful ways, but we help develop creative and energetic collaborative units that connect teachers and students who might otherwise work in isolation. In this lively session, attendees will see examples of successful large and small collaborations, and develop strategies for collaborative work in their own schools.

Collaboration is key to building community within a school, and school librarians are positioned to work effectively with others to create a community where students problem-solve, interact with diverse perspectives, and thrive as learners. Collaboration requires planning, engagement, as well as creativity and flexibility. This session will provide examples of successful collaborative projects both large and small, and will provide strategies and frameworks for participants to use in their own school situations. Participants will discuss what roadblocks they encounter in schools, learn how to identity potential collaborative partners, and start to envision ways in which they can implement significant collaborative units with students at the center of the learning.